Region IV – KIng County

Alice Lake: This lake of 33 acres lies about 2 ½ miles south of Fall City. It’s a Bow lake and usually has a lot of holdovers. Access is via Preston/Fall City Rd. southeast to a left on Alice Lake Rd. SE. to the lake. There is a public launch area in the south east corner.

Ames Lake: No access, it is totally surrounded by private property.

Angle Lake: This is a metro lake holding Bows, Kokanee, Bass, Perch, and Catfish. It is located at the junction of WA 99 and South 194th St. with access through the park at this location.

Angeline Lake: This one of a group of ten lakes making up the Foss River group of lakes. Access is from Skykomish east on US 2 to a right on Foss River Rd. NE. There is a FS Ranger Station just before the turn where you can get FS maps of the whole region. Foss River Rd. becomes FSR 68 which follows the river upstream to where a trail system takes over going to the lakes. Some of them can be a little rough. The first lake is Trout Lake which holds Bows. Next in line upstream is Delta Lake, which holds Bows and Cutts. Shortly after leaving Trout Lake up the mountain on your right is Malachite Lake which holds Bows and Cutts. My reasoning for mentioning this one next is that this one is the closest at this altitude and the rest are close by at about the same altitude. Just south of here is Copper Lake, which holds Bows and Cutts. Just south is Little Heart Lake which holds Bows and Cutts, then Big Heart Lake which also holds Bows and Cutts. Just east is Angeline Lake, holding Cutts. East of here is Azurite Lake, holding Cutts and east again is Otter Lake, also holding Cutts. A short distance south and slightly west of Angeline is Chetwood Lake, holding Bows. Angeline is the largest at 198 acres and Trout Lake the smallest at 17 acres. This is one trip I would love to take were I not partially disabled. Three week to a month in the mountains with what I could carry fishing for trout, some of which have never seen an artificial fly. What could be better?

Bass Lake: This lake contains Cutts, Bass, Crappie and Perch. It is located about 3 ½ miles north of Enumclaw on WA 169 to a left on a short unnamed road to a primitive launch area.
Bear Lake: This is a Bow lake. Take the Middle Fork Rd. up the Snoqualmie River, which becomes FSR 5600/5630 up the Taylor River to the end, then a trail up the mountain to Snoqualmie Lake and then on to Bear Lake.

Beckler River: This is a Bow river originating in Snohomish Co. and joining the “Sky” at the town of Skykomish. Access is from US 2 east to a left on Becker River Rd. which follows it upstream becoming FSR 65 and 6530.

Beaver Lakes: The nearest town is Issaquah. From Issaquah on I-90 take the Issaquah / Fall City Road north to the junction with SE Duthie Hill Road. Follow this road 2.6 miles to SE Issaquah / Beaver Lake Road, it becomes SE 32nd Street. Take a right on 244th Ave. SE. to a right on SE 24th to the park. From Fall City, follow WA 202 to SE Duthie Hill Road, take a left and watch for Beaver Lake Road on your right, following this to the access and the lake. This is actually 3 lakes connected by small channels. Total acreage is 82 acres. My research shows the best areas are from the launch ramp along the shoreline south to the channel leading to the lower lake and north along the eastern shore to about mid-lake. There is a large shallow area along the west shore just north of the launch area. Aerial photography shows weed growth in that area, which might prove to be worthwhile working over with nymphs. Due to lily pads around the launch area and the south end of the lake in general, I would start with damsel or dragonfly patterns. I’m guessing the fish will be either holdover or planted Bows.

Big Creek: This stream produces Bows well into the fall. Access is from North Bend, via 428th Ave. SE. / North Fork Rd SE. upstream to where it crosses the mouth of Big Creek. From there it’s rough trails following the creek.

Bitter Lake: The nearest town is Seattle. From I-5 take the 130th Street off-ramp and drive west to US 99. Access to Bitter Lake Park is at the corner of 130th and 99 which has a primitive launch area. Most of the total western shoreline and the area on the eastern shoreline where the lake necks down, according to my research, are the most productive areas on this 19 acre lake. It supposedly is stocked regularly with Bows, Cutts, and Brookies.

Black Lake: This lake contains Bows and Cutts. Access is from Snoqualmie, via Meadowbrook Way SE. to SE Reinig Rd., to 396th Ave. SE. The final part of the route is from Weyerhauser Main Line Rd. to Tolt Reservoir Rd, which passes the south shore. There is a primitive launch area on the southwest shore. Mud Lake is located about a mile north of here on the Main Line, about 18 acres holding Bows.

Black Diamond Lake: This is actually a pond holding Bows and Catfish, located southwest of the town of Black Diamond at the end of 248th Ave. SE. I’ve heard it’s hard gaining access. Back in the ‘80’s all it took was to ask the land owner at that time.

Brewster Lake: This is a private lake located east of North Bend.

Bridges Lake: This is a series of 3 lakes, Klaus, Boyle, and Bridges, from south to north. All hold Cutts. I can say without exception I have never seen a FSR with so many spur roads that go nowhere. From Snoqualmie take the Tolt Reservoir Rd and after the large clear cut take the 3rd left, none of these roads seem to be named or numbered. At the “Y”, bear left and at the next one right; Take the next left to Klaus Lake. Continue to the 4 way intersection and go left, north to the 4th left to Boyle Lake. From the 3rd left, on Tolt Reservoir Rd. at the “Y” bear right, at the next 2 left, then a right, left, right, left, right, and then the 2nd left to the west shore of Bridges.

Burien Lake: Another private lake.

Calligan Lake: This lake holds both Bows and Cutts. Access is from North Bend on 478th Ave. SE. to North Fork Rd. SE., to Lake Hancock Rd., Spur 10 Gate Rd., and finally FSR 2900 to the 2nd right to the lakes northwest corner and a primitive launch area. It is best in the fall. Calligan Creek which drains the lake from the southwest corner drains to the North Fork of the Snoqualmie. It too is best in the fall for Bows.

Cedar Creek / Cedar Lake: The lake is closed to fishing as it is a water supply for Seattle. Fishing is allowed both above and below the lake however. The creek heads under Yakima Pass and holds Bows in the upper reaches and Sea-run Cutts and Steelhead in the lower reaches. Numerous roads cover the lower reaches. Rock Creek, located within the Natural Area is a tributary of the Green and holds Native Bows.

Cherry Lake / Creek: The lake carries Bows and Cutts; the creek Cutts and Brooks. Access is from Duvall on NE Big Rock Rd. to Kelly Rd. NE to a “Y”, bearing right and again at the next one. At the next “Y” bear left to Swan Loop Rd. At the 4 way intersection turn right to Stossel Creek Way to Kelly Rd. NE. The road crosses the creek; the lake is about a mile upstream.

Coal Creek: This creek along with Kimball Creek which joins the Coal about a ¼ mile south of Snoqualmie, carry Bows and Cutts. The streams joined together, empty into the Snoqualmie just north of that town.

Cottage Lake: This is a private lake with no public access.

Cougar Creek: This creek is a tributary to the White River, holding Bows and Cutts and located north of North Bend. There are beaver ponds on the upper reaches. Access is from North Bend on 428th Ave. SE. to the North Fork Road, SE. From here it’s to FSR 57 and 5700-1 to the creek.

Crater Lake: This is a Cutt lake of 17 acres. Access is from NE Old Cascade Hwy. off US 2 to FSR 6410 / Miller River Rd. to FSR 6420/ Money Creek Rd past Elizabeth Lake to FSR 6420-1 then it’s about a one mile hike up to the lake.

Deep Creek: This creek holds Bows, Brooks and Cutts. Access is from Snoqualmie on the Weyerhauser Main Line Rd. to Tolt Reservoir Rd. to FSR 5700-1. At the first “Y” bear right, at the second go straight, at the 3rd and 4th bear left. The creek will be on your right and the road crosses it twice at which point you have just about run out of water.

Lake Desire: This lake may also be known as Echo Lake, and is 72 acres in size. There is public access from the north shore. Access is from Renton on 108th SE then east on 176th (Petrovitsky Road) to SE 184th Street then north on 172nd Street SE to a right on West Lake Desire Dr. along the west shore of the lake to the launch area in the northwest corner. Planted with Bows it usually provides some nice holdovers on the spring opening. My research shows that the north and south ends of the lake adjacent to the inlet and outlet streams to be the best areas for fly fishing. It is unknown however what time of year these areas are the most productive, but it’s a place to start.

Dolloff Lake: This lake holds Bows, Bass, Catfish and Perch. It’s located in Lakeland, access is from Military Rd. South, to 31st Ave. S. to South 304th Street, to a left on 38th Ave. S. to an improved launch area in the SE corner. It has very limited shoreline access.

Dorothy/Snoqualmie Lakes: To reach Dorothy Lake take US 2 (Stevens Pass Hwy) to Skykomish then the Old Cascade Hwy W. to Miller River Rd. NE which becomes FSR 6410 to FSR 6412 and follow it to the end, about 10 miles, and the trail head. It’s a 1 ½ mile hike to the lake, which contains Cutts and Brooks within its 290 acres. My research shows the north and south ends of the lake to be the best fishing areas. From Dorothy it is about a mile hike to Bear Lake, a 49 acre lake which holds Bows and Cutts. Again the north and south shores seem to be the best bets. There used to be an old hut on the north shore, not known if it still exists or not. This lake drains into Deer Lake which is a long cast to the SE. The trail conveniently goes around the north end of the lake which happens to be the best fishing area. This lake also contains Bow and Cutts. It drains into Snoqualmie Lake a mile away by trail. This lake contains Bows, Cutts, and Brooks in its 126 acres. There is a trail which follows the east shoreline, which is only accessible during low water or dry weather conditions. It’s convenient because this appears to be the most productive area on the lake also. If you decide you want to access these lakes from the Snoqualmie end of the chain, check with the FS first to make sure the Taylor River Bridge is open to traffic. If so take I-90 to the 468th Ave. SE exit about 4 miles east of North Bend to the SE Middle Fork Rd. or SE Dorothy Lake Rd. to FSR 5600 to FSR 5630 and follow it to the end and the trail head for Snoqualmie Lake. It then is a 2 ½ mile hike to the lake. If the bridge is closed it’s another 7 miles of hiking. Personally even if I were able to hike anymore I would trade a 6 mile round trip via the Dorothy Lake route and hit all 4 lakes than a five mile jaunt to fish just one, or possibly a 12 mile hike.

Dream Lake: This lake contains Bows. Continue past the access point for Marten Lake (See Directions) for about 2 miles to Big Creek. Park here and hike up the stream to the lake, about 1 ½ miles.

Drunken Charlie Lake: This lake contains Bows and Cutts. See directions to Cherry Lake and Creek for directions up to the 4 way intersection. Go straight on Stossel Creek Rd. to the 3rd “Y” and bear right. At the next bear left and at the “T” turn left. At the next “Y” make a “U” turn to your right. At the next “Y” bear right and at the next left. The road makes a sweeping left turn and goes into a small “S” turn. This is where you want to park. The lake is about a ¼ mile through the brush on your right.

Echo Lake: This lake is located southwest of Snoqualmie and has no public access.

Echo Lake: It holds Bows. This lake is located in Shoreline, with access from WA 99 east on North 200th St. to a right on Interurban Trail/Ashworth Ave. N. to Echo Lake Park, the only access to the lake.

Fenwick Lake: This lake contains Bows and spiny rays. It is located SW from Kent. Access is from junction of WA 167 and WA 181 to WA 516 to a left on Reith Rd, to Fenwick Lake Rd. This road parallels the west shore to the park and an improved launch area on the west shore.

Fish Lake: This lake contains Bows and Cutts and is located about 1 ½ miles southwest of Cumberland on Veazie / Cumberland Rd. SE. to a right on SE 370th St. to 371st St, to the third right. Just past this turn is the public access launch area for this lake. Deep Lake is located at the initial turn off.

Five Mile Lake: This lake is located SW of Auburn and contains Bows and Largemouth Bass. Take a right turn on S. 366th St, off Military Rd. S. This will take you to Five Mile Lake Park and the public launch area.

Foss River: This is a Bow river, producing well from May into October. Access is east of Skykomish off US 2 on Foss River Rd. / FSR 68, which follows the river all the way to its headwaters. It joins with the Tye and Beckler to form the “Sky”. Good starter flies for this stream would be # 14 Caddis or Yellow Humpy.

Geneva Lake: This is a Bow lake, with some husky holdovers. Access is from Military Rd south of Auburn to S.342nd St., to 42nd Ave. S. to S 345th St. to the public access launch area on the southwest shore.

Granite Creek: This is a good Cutt stream from late summer into fall. Access is from I-90 east of North Bend at the 468th Ave. SE. exit, left to SE Middle Fork Rd. to a “Y”. A left on FSR 5600 will take you to the lower reaches and the mouth of the creek. A right on Granite Creek Rd. will take you to the upper reaches, almost to the headwaters. It drains the Granite Lakes.

Green Lake: This lake is located almost in the center of Seattle. It contains planted Bows and is most productive in late summer and fall. There is total access to the shoreline and numerous points to launch car toppers. There are rental boats available.

Green River: This is one of the state’s top producers of winter and summer steelhead along with excellent Bow fishing in the upper reaches near Lester. I won’t bother to cover the lower reaches from Kent on down as there are just too many roads, streets, etc. leading to the water. Access above this area is by way of Green River Rd., Green Valley Rd. to a north on WA 169. From here the route is on Enumclaw/Franklin Rd. to the Green River Gorge Rd. to Palmer and the Headworks / Green River Rd. The lake is closed to fishing. Above the lake it is all FSR’s, 54 to 5400-2, and 52, to 5200 to 7040 to 7036-1 to the end. Eagle Lake is about 13 miles west of Lester on FSR 54, holding Cutts, with Little Eagle Lake about a mile NW by trail.

Greenwater River: This stream joins the White River about 17 miles east of Enumclaw, where WA 410 crosses it. The stream holds Bows, Cutts, and Brooks. Access is from WA 410 to FSR 70 at Greenwater and follows the stream up to its headwaters. Hine’s Camp is about 7 miles in. Trail at the end of the road continues on about 2 miles to the Meeker Lakes, which also hold Cutts, Bows and Brooks.

Haller Lake: This lake holds Bows and spiny rays. Access is from I-5 at NE 130th St. west to Meridian Ave., and south to the lake. There is limited access, as far as I can tell, only from the end of Meridian Ave and 125th St. This is definitely a Metro Lake.

Hancock Lake: This lake holds Bows, Cutts, and Kokanee. It is located north of North Bend, with access from 428th Ave. to North Fork Rd. to a right on Hancock Lake Rd, to a right on Spur 10 Rd., and finally to a right on FSR 3200 to the access point on the north shore. It is best in the fall.

Hansen Creek: This is a Cutt stream with summer and fall the best. It drains Scout Lake and joins the Snoqualmie at the Bandera airstrip 7 miles west of Snoqualmie Pass. Access is from I-90 at exit for FSR 55, south to Tinkham Rd., and right to FSR 5510 / Hansen Creek Rd. which follows the stream, upstream to its headwaters. At the end of the road it is about a 1 ½ mile hike to Scout Lake, which also holds Cutts and Bows.

Holm/Neilson Lake: This is a marshy 18 acre lake holding Bows and Bass. Access is from the Auburn/Black Diamond Rd. via Holm Lake Rd. There is a public launch area on the south end of the lake off this road.

Issaquah Creek: This creek holds Bows and Cutts providing excellent fishing in the spring and summer and provides good Steelhead and Sea-run Cutt action in the fall and winter. Roads along the stream provide easy access, though much of the land is privately owned, permission to trespass is usually given if asked. Access to the mouth is at the public launch area on Lake Sammamish. The headwaters are near Hobart.

Jones Lake: Located near Black Diamond. Last known there was no access.

Joy Lake: This lake contains Bows and produces well in April and May. Access is from WA 203, about 2 miles north of Carnation, via Kelly Rd. NE and Lake Joy Rd. which circles the lake. There is a public access launch area on the northwest shore.

Juanita Lake: This lake also known as Totem, Wittenmeyer, or Mud Lake. It is a 3 acre pond producing Bass and Crappie. It is located in Totem Lake Park, off I-405 to 120th Ave. NE to Totem Lake Way to Totem Lake Park and the lake. This is a great lake for kids.

Kathleen Lake (Meadow): This lake produces Bows, Perch and Bass. Access is from about 4 miles east of Renton on 128th Street E., to Lake Kathleen Rd. There is limited access to this lake. Recommend trying the north end.

Lake Killarney: This is a spiny ray lake containing Perch and Bass. Access is from I-5 to WA 18 northbound take the first exit to Weyerhauser Way South to 344th Way east to 38th Ave. S. There is a public access area on the northeast shore. Lake Geneva is across the street.

Kings Lake: This is a Brook Trout lake with the best times in the spring and again in the fall. It’s a 3 acre pond surrounded by a 50 acre Peat Bog Natural Preserve. Access is from Snoqualmie on the Weyerhauser Main Line Rd. to Tolt Reservoir Rd., to your 2nd left, A Forest Service Rd. Follow this north to your 2nd right. Follow this road to a “Y” and bear right and at the next “T” turn left. At your 3rd right you will be just east of the lake on your left. There supposedly is a fire break road (Ten Creek Fire Rd.) that passes within a 100 yards of the lake.

Kulla Kulla Lake: This and 7 other lakes are all tied together by the Pratt Lake Trail System. This lake of 60 acres contains Cutts and Bows. Access to these lakes and the trail system is from I-90 on FSR 9030 at the east end of the Bandera Air Strip. FSR 9030 continues at your first right, dead ending nearly due south of Talapus Lake, which holds Brooks and accessed by trail from the end of the road. Continuing straight on the road puts you on FSR 9031 which continues up the mountain to a dead end. The Ira Spring Memorial Trail from there takes you to Mason Lake, which holds Bows. Other lakes in the system are Olallie Lake, just northeast of Talapus, holding Cutts and Brooks. Pratt Lake contains Brooks. Rainbow, Blazer and Little Mason are the other 3 lakes in this group. All of them are Rainbow lakes and all of them are close together.

Langlois Lake: This is a Bow lake, with some big hold-overs. Access is from Carnation south on WA 203 to a left on 24th St, to the 5th left to the lake and a primitive launch area.

Lennox Creek: This is a Bow and Cutt stream with the best fishing during the fall. This is a tributary to the North Fork of the Snoqualmie and the North Fork County Rd. picks it up where they join and follows it upstream for about 7 miles.

Leota Lake: This lake contains Bows, Bass and Catfish. It is located east of Woodenville about 2 miles, adjacent to the south side of the Woodenville/Duvall highway. There is difficult access.

Lucerne/Pipe Lakes: Bows come on in the spring, but best fishing is later for Perch and Bass. Cutts and Catfish also present. Access is from WA 516 to 218th Ave. SE, to a left on 265th Way to a right on 217th Ave. SE north to the northern edge of the Cherokee Bay Community Club property to the launch area on the left. It’s on the southern end of the channel between the two lakes.

Margaret Lake: Also known as Marion Lake. This is a Cutt lake which starts slow but really picks up during the late summer and fall. The lake is located about 3 ½ miles northeast of Duvall via 320th Ave. NE. north, to a right on 197th St. To a right on 324th Ave. to a left on 195th St. The launch area is immediately after the left turn on the left.

Marie Lake: This is a Cutt lake that produces well in the spring but really comes on in the late summer and fall. It is located NE of Fall City on WA 202 east to a left on 356th Dr. SE. to a right on 364th Ave. SE. to a left on 34th St. Where it makes a sharp turn to the left, park and it’s a short walk to the lake. At 10 acres it should be a good tube lake.

Marmot Lake: This is a Cutt lake that fishes well in the summer and fall. There are 2 routes to this lake. One is over Deception Pass with a hike of 8 ½ miles one way. The other is from US 2 to FSR 68 just east of Skykomish to FSR 6830 to the end of the road, then a leisurely climb to the lake and a lot shorter than 8 ½ miles. Lake Clarice is about a mile away which holds Brooks.

Marten Lake: This lake contains Bows. Access is from I-90 east of North Bend at the 468th Ave. SE exit to SE Middle Fork Rd, which becomes FSR 5600 up the Middle Fork of the Snoqualmie. It becomes FSR 5630 and about 3 ½ miles past the campground the road crosses the outlet stream from the lake. Park here and follow the stream up to the lake, about a mile.

Martin Creek: This creek holds Bows and Cutts. Access is From US 2 on the Old Cascade Hwy. to FSR 6710 which follows it nearly to its headwaters. The creek breaks away from the road and goes up the ridge to your right at the point where FSR 6710 makes a “U” turn before going up the ridge on your left. With the exception of a couple of spur road on your left that goes to the creek actual access to the water is a little difficult.

McDonald Lake: This is an 18 acre Bass lake, located about a half mile southeast of Lake Kathleen. Access is from Renton on 128th St. SE, to a right on 196 Ave. SE, to a left on 149 St. SE. which will take you to a primitive launch area on the south shore.

McLeod Lake: This is a small 13 acre lake, containing Bows and Brooks. It is located north of North Bend via 428th Ave. SE, to the North Fork Rd. to the junction of FSR 5700 and Hancock Lake Rd. Turn left and follow this road to your 3rd right which will take you to the lake and a primitive launch area. This last quarter mile might be a little rough in wet weather as it traverses an open field.

Lake Meridian: This lake is located about 4 miles east of Kent. There is a public launch area in the SE corner adjacent to the Lake Meridian Park, off 152nd Way SE, off WA 516, about 2 miles west of WA 18. Bows provide the initial action in the spring with Kokanee and Bass picking up the slack as the weather warms. It does produce some large bass. Most productive areas are at both ends of the lake.

Metcalf Slough/Lake: This is a series of marshy ponds as is the lake. Both hold Brooks and Cutts. The slough drains to the lake which in turn drains to Fury Lake. They sit north of Snoqualmie, via 402nd Ave SE, to the Weyerhauser Mainline Rd to Tolt Reservoir Rd. which passes along side Fury Lake. Bear left just past Fury Lake and at the next 2 “Y”s bear left to the lake. It is probably best fished from a tube if the marsh line is too high. I can find nothing on Lake Fury, but it stands to reason that the fish would migrate to the larger body of water during dry periods and you have total access to the eastern shore, alongside the road so why not give it a whirl.

Miller River: This river, located about 2 miles west of Skykomish on the Old Cascade Hwy provides good fishing for Bows during October. Miller River Rd. follows the river to its headwaters. From the end of the road, follow the creek to the fork and then left and up the mountain to Lake Dorothy. There is a FS campground near the rivers mouth and two more up along the river.

Moneysmith Lake: This is a spiny ray lake located about 4 miles east of Auburn. It contains Bass, Crappie, Catfish, and exceptionally large Perch. Access is from WA 18 to Auburn / Black Diamond Rd, to 336th St. SE, to Lake Moneysmith Rd. which passes the south end of the lake where there is a primitive access point.

Moolock Lake: This lake contains Bows and Cutts, Hancock Lake holds Bows, Cutts, and Brooks. Nadeau Lake holds Bows, Montana Black Spots were planted here in ’51, but no one seems to know if they have been planted since or what happened to the original planters. SMC Lake holds Bows. Access to this group of lakes is from North Bend on North Fork Rd., to Hancock Lake Rd., to a right on Spur 10 Rd to FSR 3200 to Lake Hancock. Continue from the south side to your 2nd “Y”, bearing right to the 3rd “Y” bearing left. At the 4 way intersection go straight and bear right at the next “Y” to SMC Lake. A left will take you to Nadeau Lake. A left will take you to a “T”; go right for access to Nadeau and Moolock which is just a short distance beyond Nadeau.

Morton Lake: This lake contains Bows, with April being the best time. Access is from Auburn on WA 516 or from WA 18 to Covington Way to 188th Ave. SE. to the lake and the public launch area which is at the end of the street.
Murphy Lakes: These lakes hold Bows and Cutts. These are hike in lakes with access from Scenic on US 2. There are no formal trails to this lake. Some of the material I’ve found suggests following the ridge line just to the west of the lake which would be ok if you don’t mind hiking up and down the folds in the ridge. I would suggest you follow the small creek crossing the treeless line just west and south of the parking area and follow the valley up to the lake. It is a gradual climb with a lot of open area which would make it a lot easier climb.

Newaukum Creek: This creek located NE of Enumclaw is a tributary of the Green containing Bows, Cutts and some Steelhead. Access is from WA 410 from Enumclaw to Weyerhauser Main Line Rd. north to the 2nd “Y” bear left and just past the 2nd left you’ll cross the creek flowing west then north to join the Green near Palmer. There are a lot of roads that cross or follow this stream giving you fairly easy access to the water.

Nordrum Lake: This is the largest, 60 acres, in this group of 5 lakes including Judy, Carole, Rock and Lunker lakes at the headwaters of the Taylor River. Nordrum holds Cutts, the rest Bows and Cutts. Access is from North Bend up the Middle Fork of the Snoqualmie on the SE Middle Fork Rd, and then up FSR 5600 and FSR 5630, up the Taylor River’s South Fork. At roads end the stream forks, take the right fork on up the mountain to Carole and Judy. Trails connect all 5. Probably best to take a tube, though all have shoreline access, some of it is rather steep.

North Lake: This lake is a Bow lake, though last known Perch inhabited it also. It is on the schedule for rehabilitation if it hasn’t been already. Access is from I-5 to WA 18 to the first exit and follow Weyerhauser Way South, northwest to the first right after the 2nd Roundabout. This road will take you to the lake and the public launch area on the northwest shore.

Panther Lake: This is a spiny ray lake of 30 acres and last known NO public access.

Paradise Lake: There are Cutthroats in paradise. This is an 18 acre private lake.

Peterson Lake: This is a 10 acre mixed species lake, containing Bows, Perch, catfish, and some Large Cutts. It is located just north of Petrovitsky Rd. adjacent to the junction of this road, Sweeney Rd., 200th St. Se. and 196th Ave. SE. Take a right off Petrovitsky Rd on 212th Ave SE. to SE Pipeline Rd. It’s open all year. There is a primitive launch area just off the pipeline Rd. There’s a lot of submerged trees and downed timber around the shoreline. This is perfect water for a tube and Cutts.

Phantom Lake: Another lake with NO public access. It is located near the Bellevue airport.

Phillipa Lake / Isabella Lake: Phillipa holds Bows and Isabella has Cutts. The two lakes are about 200 yards apart. Access is from North Bend via 402nd Ave. SE. to the Weyerhauser Mainline Rd. to Tolt Reservoir Rd. to the Spur Ten Gate Rd. At the 3rd “Y” bear right and then your next left onto FSR 2900 and take your 2nd right. From here I can’t find any numbers or names for any of the roads. Pass the next 2 intersections on your left. You can take the next left and trim a couple of miles, or stay on the road you’re on, whichever you think is the best road. If you take this left you will want to turn left again at the “T”. Follow this road around and along the north shore of Calligan Lake to a sharp “U” turn. Ignore the right in the middle. Bear right at the next “Y” and follow the road up along the ridge line. At the next “Y” bear left and then right and follow it to the end. From here it is a hike, down the mountain through mostly open land to the lake. It is best fished from a tube. Access to Isabella is from the southeast shore line. Be careful on the scree slopes on both sides of the ridge separating the two lakes. All it takes is to kick two or three pieces loose and you have a slide going.

Pine Lake: Located in the town of Pine Lake it holds Bows. Access is from 228th Ave. to 26th St. SE to the Pine Lake Park which has a public launch area and a large fishing pier on the east shore. This lake usually starts off slow but holds up for the entire season.

Pratt River: This river holds Bows, Cutts, and Brooks and is best during the summer into fall, when water levels are down a bit. Access is from the Middle Fork Rd. north for about 4 ½ miles to where the road touches the west bank of the Snoqualmie where the river makes a sharp “S” turn. Wade across the river at this point and walk back down to where the Pratt comes in. There is an unmaintained trail that follows the Pratt upstream for about 4 miles. There are rough camp sites along the stream.

Preston Mill Ponds: This pair of ponds holds Bows. They are located just north of I-90 at the southeast edge of the town of Preston, off the Preston / Fall City Rd. SE.

Raging River: This river is primarily a winter Steelhead stream. It heads south of I-90 and the upper reaches are followed by the Upper Preston Rd. SE. After crossing I-90 the Preston / Fall City Rd. SE. picks it up to its point of confluence with the “Sno” at Fall City.

Rattlesnake Lake: This is a Bow lake. Access is from I-90 near North Bend south on 436th Ave. SE. to Cedar Falls Rd. SE. to Snoqualmie Valley Trail and 3 primitive launch areas. There are also primitive launch areas on the northwest shore.

Ravensdale Lake / Ravensdale Creek: This is a brush lined lake hosting Bows and Cutts. It provides good fishing for both species in the spring and fall. Access is from Black Diamond on the Black Diamond / Ravensdale Rd. which passes the lake within a few yards. Launching even a car topper is going to be difficult. A tube is the best bet for fly fishermen or even worm dunkers for that matter unless you can stand the noise of passing trains along the east shore. The creek drains to Sawyer Lake, a distance of about 3 miles. It also holds Bows and Cutts. This is also very brushy, though there are trails going to or paralleling the stream. The stream fishes best in the spring and summer. It passes under WA 169, Maple Valley / Black Diamond RD. SE. just south of 288th St. SE. Aerial photography shows a lot of what appear to be beaver pond along the road in this area also, that might be worth exploring.

Red Creek: A small stream producing Brooks in late summer it is a tributary to the White River. Access is from WA 410 about 6 miles east of Enumclaw, which crosses the creek at this point. A mile or so further on 410 to a left is 323rd Ave SE. going northwest which may also cross it near the same point. The Weyerhauser Main Line Rd. may also cross it a little further downstream.

Retreat Lake: NO public access known. It is located about 2 miles east of Ravensdale and holds Bows, Cutts, and Kokanee.

Rock Creek: This stream holds Bows and Cutts and joins the Cedar River about 3 miles upstream from Maple Valley. This is the only information I can find on this one. If anyone has any more accurate information, please contact me direct at wpt4571@gmail.com.

Rutherford Slough: This water contains Bows and Bass, with April through August being the best time frame to fish it. It is located just north of Fall City adjacent to WA 203. 39th Place SE nearly encircles it.

Sammamish Lake: This lake is about 8 miles long and covers over 4800 acres. It holds Large and Smallmouth Bass, Perch, Catfish, Bows, Cutts, Kokanee, Salmon and Steelhead. Cutts start in the spring and fall, with Kokanee coming on in May, with Bass coming on a little later, Largemouth in the marshy north end and Smallmouth in the south end. Hot spots for them in the south end is at the mouth of Issaquah Creek, the area around 47*- 34’ – 43” N X 122* – 04’ – 38” W, and the area around the point at 47* – 35’ – 30” N x 122* 05’ – 20” W north to the next point.

Sammamish River: Flows from the lake NW to empty into Lake Washington at Kenmore. There is a public launch area at the Kenmore Bridge. It is a sluggish, ditch like stream, but it does carry a winter run of steelhead and a spring and fall run of sea-run Cutts.

Sawyer Lake: This is a year round lake containing Kokanee, Bows, Cutts, Bass, Crappie, Perch, and Catfish. It is located south of Maple Valley and WA 516. Access is from WA 516, south on 216th Ave. SE. to 296th St. SE, to 224th Ave. SE., to a left on 312 St. SE, to the public launch area in the park adjacent to the outlet stream.

Shadow Lake: This is a planted Bow lake. It is located northwest of Maple Valley with access from WA 18 (Auburn / Echo Lake Cutoff Rd.) to 232nd St. to a right on 196th Ave. SE. to the 3rd left and to the end of the road in the north east corner for the public launch area. There also appears to be a smaller launch area at the extreme north end off 191st Ave. SE.

Shady Lake: This is another Planted Bow lake, what I call a “put and take fishery”. Access is from Renton via SE. Petrovitsky RD. to 196th Dr., which with 192nd Dr encircles the lake. There is a public launch area on the south shore.

Sikes Lake: This lake hosts Brook Trout, Catfish, Bass, and Crappie. It is located northwest of Carnation and access is via Ames Lake / Carnation Rd. NE to 284th Ave. NE., which crosses the lake about in the middle. This is a long narrow boomerang shaped lake, with near total shoreline access there is no need for a boat or tube. A long double haul cast will nearly reach the opposite shore from where you are fishing.

Snoqualmie Lake: See posting for Dorothy/Snoqualmie Lakes.

Snoqualmie River, Main Stem: Formed by the confluence of the North, Middle, and South Forks about a mile east of the town. It plunges over Snoqualmie Falls just south of town. The falls stop any further upstream migration of anadromous fish. Winter Steelhead, are the big attraction from the falls to the mouth and confluence with the “Sky”. Summer or “sunshine” steelheading starts around the first of July, with the winter fish starting in December on into March. Sea-run Cutts are available from mid-July into fall. Since roads cover most of the east bank it can be very well covered from the bank, though there are launch sites for drift fishing at the mouth of the Raging River, the Tolt, and the Tokul.

Snoqualmie River, North Fork: This branch holds Bows, Cutts, Whitefish, and Dollies. The North Fork Rd, Lake Hancock Rd, and Spur 10 Rd. cover about 15 miles of the river, before swing up Lennox Creek for another 4 miles.

Snoqualmie River, Middle Fork: This branch holds Cutts and Bows with Cutts predominate. Access is from North Bend via North Bend Way SE. to 140th St. SE. to the Middle Fork Rd. SE. to FSR 5600 and 5630 which cover the entire length of the river.

Snoqualmie River, South Fork: This branch holds Cutts and Bows, again with Cutts predominating. There is easy access to this branch since I-90 follows it closely for about 20 miles to Snoqualmie Pass. There are campsites at Asahel, Curtis, Denny Creek, and Commonwealth with FS campgrounds along the upper river.

Snow Creek: This creek produces Cutts during the summer. Access is from Palmer via Green River Headworks Rd. to FSR 54, to FSR 5400-3, to FSR 5400-2, to FSR 5400-1, and finally to FSR 5000 which follows the creek to its headwaters.

Snow Lake: This lake produces Bows sand Cutts. Based on aerial photography dated 13 July 2013 there was still a lot of snow around the lake. I would recommend late July or August to plan a trip, depending on weather. This lake is part of the Snoqualmie Middle Fork headwater system. Access is from I-90 at WA 906 north to Erste Strasse to the Alpental Access Rd. to the end. From there it is a 4 mile hike up the Snow Lake Trail. Gem Lake a ½ mile further up the mountain carries Bows.

Spring Lake: This is a spiny ray lake, including Bass. It is located southeast of Renton via I-405, to WA 169 to 196th Ave. SE. or from the south off WA 18 to WA 169 north of Maple Valley to SE Petrovitsky Rd. to 196th Ave. SE. to Spring Lake Dr, around to the west side of the lake to the end of the road and the public launch area on your left..

Star Lake: April and May are the best months for this lakes Bows. It also holds Bass, Kokanee, and Catfish. Access is via I-5 in Kent, to the 272nd St. S. exit to your first right on Military Rd. south to a left on Star Lake Rd. The public launch area, small, is about half way through the roads “S” turns on the left. It is marked by Yellow paint stripes on either side of the driveway.

Steel Lake: This is a spiny ray lake, containing Sunfish, Bass, Crappie, Perch and Catfish. It is located in Federal Way with access via WA 99 to 308th St. S and 24th Ave. S. through the Steel Lake Park located on the south shore. There is a public access launch area.

Stossel Creek: This is a brushy stream containing Cutts and Bows. Access is from Stillwater via Stillwater Hill Rd. E., To Kelly Rd. NE. to NE Stossel Creek Way, to Stossel Rd. It joins the Tolt about 5 miles northeast of Carnation.

Sunday Creek: This is a spring and fall Bow producer. Access is from North Bend on the North Fork County Rd, which crosses the stream near the mouth at about 17 miles. At the top of the grade leading down to the creek there is a “Y”, going right then left at the next one, ignoring the next 3 and then left at the next will take you to Loch Katrine, a 51 acre lake containing Bows. It is best from July on. Going back 2 turns will take you down to Sunday Creek again. From this point it is about a 4 mile hike up the creek to Sunday Lake which holds Bows, Brooks and Cutts. Upper Loch Katrine is a 24 acre lake containing Bows and Cutts. Some people recommend hiking up to it from Sunday Lake, about 1 ½ miles in addition to the 4 you already hiked to get to Sunday Lake. I would recommend driving up to Loch Katrine and then hiking about a mile on a gradual downgrade to Upper Loch Katrine. The only strenuous part of the hike would be getting down to Loch Katrine and back up, which really isn’t that bad. I’m thinking probably a 2 ½ mile hike at most round trip and you get to leisurely fish two lakes.

Sunday Creek: This Sunday Creek is a tributary to the Green River, entering the upper Green about 2 miles upstream from Lester. FSR 5400-1 follows it for about 5 miles. It provides some good action on Bows in early summer and again in the fall.

Surprise and Glacier Lakes: Both of these lakes hold Brooks. Access is from Scenic on US 2, Stevens Pass Highway, about a 4 ½ mile hike south of the parking area on a marked trail. There are camp sites at both lakes. Glacier is about a mile further south than Surprise.

Swans Mill Pond: This lake contains Brooks. Access is from Stillwater via Kelly Rd NE, north to a right and east on Tolt Pipeline Trail about 1 ½ miles to Moses Creek Lane NE on your right. Turn left just beyond this junction. A track leads back to the lake. Probably best to stop by the house and ask permission to trespass.

Tate Creek: This is a tributary to the Snoqualmie North Fork containing Bows and Brooks. It produces well from spring into fall. It is located about a mile up 428th Ave SE from North Bend, from the mouth of the North Fork.

Taylor River: This is a major tributary to the Middle Fork of the Snoqualmie, providing good fishing for Bows and Cutts from July into the fall. Access is from the SE Middle Fork Rd from North Bend to FSR 5600, to FSR 5630 up the Middle Fork about 13 miles to the mouth of the Taylor. Road continues up the Taylor for about another 5 miles.

Thompson Lake: This is a Bow Lake. Access is from North Bend up the Middle Fork Rd. for about 3 ½ miles, to Granite Creek Rd. and follows it east to the end, passing Granite Lakes. A trail from the end of the road will take you around the end of the ridge to your left and up into the basin where the lake is at. Granite Lakes are both Rainbow lakes also.

Tokul Creek: This creek is host to Bows, Cutts, and Brooks, especially in the beaver ponds. It is also host to a small run of Steelhead. It is best in late spring, early summer and again in the fall. The lower reaches can be accessed from Snoqualmie via WA 202 (Railroad Ave.) northwest to a right on Tokul Rd SE. The upper reaches access is from North Fork Rd. SE., to FSR 5700 to a left on Spur 10 Gate Rd, to Tolt Reservoir Rd. to a “T” and a right. There are numerous spur roads along this route and beaver ponds holding Cutts and Brooks. This is especially so, on the west side of the road in the area of Mud and Black Lakes.

Tolt River: This is primarily a Steelhead stream, with summer and winter runs. The mouth is a popular spot since Steelhead stack there before moving up stream. The first 6 miles of the stream are the most popular for winter fish. The mouth is accessed from Carnation south on WA 203 to a right on Tolt Hill Rd. There is a launch area there for the “Sno”. There is a road (unnamed) which follows the north bank for miles. Tolt River Rd. roughly follows it upstream for about 6 miles. At the end, 80-St. NE and 361st Ave. NE give you access to the water. South Fork Tolt River Rd., Tolt Reservoir Rd., and FSR 6270, pick it up at the South Fork Tolt Reservoir.

Tradition Lake: A Bass lake, with NO access.

Trout Lake: This lake is located in Lakeland, northeast of Milton off Military Road South to 38th Avenue S. Take a right on 374th St. S., to a right on 40th Ave. S. to a left on 375th Place S. to a public access launch area on 376 St. S. It holds Bows and some spiny rays.

Twelve Lake: This lake is located about a mile from Black Diamond containing Bows and Cutts. There are also some Perch available. Access is from Green River Gorge Rd. SE. at the junction of 270th Ave. E. There is a trail / road from this point to the lake and a primitive launch area.

Tye River: This is a Rainbow stream followed for its entire length by US-2. It is a major tributary to the “Sky” and joins that river at the outskirts of the town of Skykomish. The stream heads at Stevens Pass. This is good dry fly fishing during the summer with a # 14 Caddis or Yellow Humpy the go to flies.

Union Lake: This is truly a metro lake, located nearly in the center of Seattle. It contains Bows, Cutts, Bass, Crappie, and Perch, along with all of the anadromous fish species at different times of the year as they pass through.

Walker Lake: This lake contains Bows, Cutts, and Sunfish. Access is from Enumclaw or Cumberland via Veazie / Cumberland Rd. to 312th Ave. SE. to Lake Walker Rd, to an improved launch area on the southwest corner of the lake. There is some downed timber along the southeast shore.

Lake Washington: This is one of the top producers in the state if you take a little time to study it. It contains Bows, Cutts, Kokanee, Small and Largemouth Bass, Catfish, Crappie, Perch, along with migrating Steelhead and Salmon. It even has Mackinaw. It is a year round lake. Trout fishing is best October through April, with Kokanee starting in May. Bass come on from May through August and again late in the fall. Silver and Chinook Salmon, concentrate at the mouths of the Sammamish and Cedar Rivers from September through November. Sea-run Cutts concentrate in these same areas during the same time period. Best area for Bass and Crappie is in Union Bay near the near the UW stadium and the inlets around the arboretum. The waters around Juanita are good for Largemouth Bass. There are numerous launch areas around the lake along with public fishing piers.

Wildcat Lakes: Both lakes contain Bows and Cutts. Easiest route is up the Middle Fork of the Snoqualmie 16 miles to Wildcat Creek, park and then hike up Wildcat Creek 2 miles to the lower lake. The upper lake is about a ¼ mile up the inlet stream to the lower lake.

Wilderness Lake: This lake contains Silver Salmon and Bows and is best in April and May. Access is from Maple Valley, north on Witte Rd. SE. to a right, east on 248th St. SE. at the roundabout, then right, south, on Lake Wilderness Dr. SE. to the launch area.

Wise Creek: This creek produces Bows and Cutts and is a tributary to the Middle Fork of the Snoqualmie, entering the river about 1 ½ miles downstream from the mouth of the Taylor River.

 

 

 

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